Answers for the Your Brain Matters quiz

Here are the correct answers to the quiz.

Q. 1  What type of brain exercises should you do to reduce your dementia risk?

  1. A mix of word and number puzzles played daily
  2. Any mental stimulation that is repetitive
  3. A variety of mental exercises that are complex, varied and interesting and done frequently

The correct answer is 3. To really exercise and challenge your brain, you should choose a variety of activities that you are interested in and enjoy doing. They can be just about anything that uses your brain, but the more complex the activity and the more often you exercise your brain, the better. Don’t forget that what you do while studying, working or volunteering counts as well as what you do in your leisure time.

Q. 2  Should you cut fats out of your diet to reduce your risk of dementia?

  1. Not entirely – you need to reduce intake of saturated fats and choose unsaturated fats
  2. Yes, all fat increases the risk of dementia so a fat-free diet provides the best protection
  3. No, fat intake doesn’t affect your risk of developing dementia

The correct answer is 1. A diet high in saturated fats increases the risk of dementia, as well as heart disease and stroke. However, unsaturated fats are important for brain health and should be included in a healthy diet in moderation.

Q. 3  Should you take vitamin supplements to reduce your risk of developing dementia?

  1. Yes, everyone should take supplements everyday
  2. No, vitamins have no effect on brain health
  3. Those who have certain vitamin deficiencies may need to take supplements, but should only do so on their doctor’s advice

The correct answer is 3. Important nutrients are best obtained through enjoying a healthy, varied diet. There is no evidence that any vitamin supplements can help prevent dementia. However, they may be recommended for people with vitamin deficiencies, which can only be diagnosed by your doctor.

Q. 4  Does your social life affect your dementia risk?

  1. Yes, people who are more socially active tend to have a lower risk of dementia
  2. Yes, people who are more socially active tend to have a higher risk of dementia
  3. No, there is no clear evidence of an association between social activity and dementia risk

The correct answer is 1. Being more socially connected and participating in more social activities is associated with a lower risk of dementia.

Q. 5  What is the relationship between sleep and dementia risk?

  1. There is no relationship between sleep and dementia risk
  2. Sleeping problems are associated with poorer brain function and may increase dementia risk
  3. Sleeping for less than 6 hours per night is associated with an increased risk of dementia

The correct answer is 2. Studies have shown that some sleep disorders are associated with an increased risk of dementia. If you are experiencing significant sleep problems, see your doctor.

Q. 6  How much physical exercise do you need to do to reduce your risk of dementia?

  1. None, there is no link between physical activity and dementia risk
  2. We do not know how much physical activity is needed to reduce dementia risk, but health guidelines recommend 30 minutes of moderate exercise a day
  3. At least two hours per day of strenuous exercise is needed to reduce dementia risk

The correct answer is 2. We have not determined yet what level of exercise is needed to reduce dementia risk, but studies show that even moderate exercise like walking is beneficial, and that any exercise is better than none. Follow the national physical activity guidelines and aim for 30 minutes a day.

Q. 7  Should smokers quit smoking to reduce their risk of dementia?

  1. Yes, smoking causes dementia
  2. No, smoking only affects the lungs and the heart, not the brain
  3. Yes, former smokers have a reduced risk of developing dementia compared to current smokers

The correct answer is 3. Smoking is a risk factor for dementia as well as cancer and heart disease. The research shows that quitting smoking is beneficial. See your doctor for help to quit.

Q. 8  At what age should you start having health checks to reduce your risk of dementia?

  1. Everyone needs to start having health checks from age 40
  2. You need to ask you doctor this question, because the age depends on your own and your family’s medical history
  3. You don’t need to have health checks until you have symptoms suggesting a problem

The correct answer is 2. The age at which you should start regularly seeing your doctor to have your blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar checked depends on your history. Talk to your doctor, have regular health checks, and treat any problems well. This is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your dementia risk.

Q. 9  Should you give up alcohol to reduce your risk of dementia?

  1. Yes, drinking alcohol causes dementia
  2. No, drinking alcohol only affects the liver, not the brain
  3. No, only excessive drinking increases the risk of developing dementia and moderate alcohol consumption may be good for the brain

The correct answer is 3. Excessive consumption of alcohol over many years can cause brain damage and dementia. However, moderate drinking (1 or 2 glasses on any day) is associated with reduced dementia risk. This is not enough reason to take up drinking if you’ve chosen or have been advised not to.

Q. 10  If you have a head injury, will you develop dementia?

  1. Head injury increases the risk for dementia, but doesn’t mean you will definitely get it
  2. Head injury is not associated with dementia risk at all
  3. Everyone who suffers a serious head injury will develop dementia 

     

The correct answer is 1. Serious head injury, especially with loss of consciousness, has been associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. But it doesn’t mean you will definitely get dementia, just that you have a higher risk. Protect your head from injury as much as possible.

 

 

 

 

Call the National Dementia Helpline on 1800 100 500 for questions, information, advice.

 

Your Brain Matters was supported by funding from the Australian Government under the Chronic Disease Prevention and Service Improvement Fund from July 2012 to June 2015.

DCRC

 

Dementia Australia would like to acknowledge the Aboriginal people as the traditional custodians and carers of the country of Australia.